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Community Cupboard executive director takes a bite out of hunger

Posted on Thursday, June 18, 2015 at 9:00 am

Louisa Resource Council Executive Director Lloyd Runnett wants to do all he can for those in need in Louisa. He has taken on his new position with the same dedication he has given while serving as a firefighter and with his own business, Muddy Boots BBQ.

Louisa Resource Council Executive Director Lloyd Runnett wants to do all he can for those in need in Louisa. He has taken on his new position with the same dedication he has given while serving as a firefighter and with his own business, Muddy Boots BBQ.

Lloyd Runnett is serious about food. His Muddy Boots BBQ is a trademarked recipe known to family, friends, and church groups throughout Louisa County.

But most of the food Runnett has handled since May 1 won’t fit on a barbecue grill. Today we find him unloading 48-inch-square pallets with 3,000 pounds of groceries onto shelves at the Louisa County Resource Council where he is the new executive director.

Runnett assumed leadership of the Resource Council following Donna Isom’s retirement after eight years in that position. He is quick to sing her praises.

“Donna did a great job during her time here and I knew that I had big shoes to fill. Now there is a lot of work ahead to expand services as the board of directors has envisioned,” Runnett said.

The Community Cupboard provides over 1,100 families with a generous supply of fresh produce, meats, dairy, and canned foods that they can pick up once a month at the warehouse at 147 Resource Lane, just off of Chalklevel Road.

Besides the Community Cupboard, other established programs – including Emergency Food Pantry, Grocery Assistance Program, Children’s Feeding Program, and Meals on Wheels —operate from the same location filling the needs of Louisa County residents who have been identified as at risk of hunger and food insecurity.

Serving others is a natural fit for Runnett, a Louisa County native who recently retired from his 30-year-career as Henrico County firefighter and Battalion Chief.

“This job isn’t much of a stretch from what I’ve done all my adult life,” he explains. “You become a firefighter because you love helping people. You have to have empathy for those who are in trouble; you are the first person they call and you have to step up with compassion and service to do your job.”

“A firefighter attends to people in crisis, when they’re most vulnerable,” Runnett said, “and does what it takes to help them. I loved that work and, when I retired from Henrico County, I prayed for another opportunity to take care of people. This is God’s answer. I have lived in Louisa County my whole life and I am so grateful to have a job where I can serve neighbors who need the most help.”

To read the entire story, see the June 18 edition of The Central Virginian.