Louisa law enforcement officer honored for service

Posted on Thursday, October 31, 2013 at 9:44 am

For a century, the Lowe family has been involved with the Masons or Ladies’ Order of the Eastern Star, groups that provide a wide array of services to their communities.

Past master of the Louisa Lodge and fellow officer Harold Porter presents the Community Builder’s Award to Louisa County Deputy Chief Major Donald Lowe during the annual Ladies Night Dinner on Thursday, Sept. 12.

Past master of the Louisa Lodge and fellow officer Harold Porter presents the Community Builder’s Award to Louisa County Deputy Chief Major Donald Lowe during the annual Ladies Night Dinner on Thursday, Sept. 12.

In more recent years, though, members of the Lowe family have dedicated themselves to their community by serving in law enforcement and volunteering in various organizations.

Members of Louisa Day Lodge #58 recognized Donald Lowe at its annual Ladies Night Dinner on Thursday, Sept. 12, bestowing him the organization’s prestigious Community Builder’s Award.

The award was presented by fellow law enforcement officer and  past lodge master Howard Porter.

In considering Lowe for the award, current lodge master Richard E. “Dicky” Dost said lodge members looked at what Lowe has done for the community over the years and found him deserving.

“He was recommended very highly,” Dost said.

Lowe said he felt humbled as he received the award. As he looked out over the crowd while accepting the honor, he said that he saw many in the audience who have also been positive role models in the community.

Though Lowe has received many departmental  awards in his job in law enforcement, he isn’t as familiar with receiving community awards.

“An award of this type here—with them, looking back over all those years—it makes it more special I think,” Lowe said.

When Lowe first moved to Louisa in 1976, he began his public service as a volunteer with the Mineral Volunteer Rescue Squad and attained the rank of captain. At that time, Lowe became one of only three cardiac technicians, which is comparable to a medic today, in the county. This meant that he responded to every heart attack and chest pain call.

As the coordinator of security systems at North Anna Power Station, he was also captain of the competition team,which met with other site teams around the state and participated in an annual competition.

Lowe left North Anna Power Station and started his law enforcement career in 1987 as a deputy sheriff with the Louisa County Sheriff’s Office.

During his career, Lowe has been involved with several high profile cases. Most notably, he worked with the Federal Bureau of Investigation on the uni-bomber case.

One case in particular, that Lowe considers to be a highlight of his career, is when he was assigned to the Narcotics Task Force and was recognized by the United States Customs Service.

Lowe said it was the Louisa County Sheriff’s Office that broke the case of a multimillion dollar international Jamaican cocaine smuggling operation that was operating from New York to the Carolinas.  The case involved a year of undercover investigation and Lowe said it was one award he is quite proud of.

To read the entire story, see the Oct. 31 edition of The Central Virginian.

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