Hole in one: tourny held at local disc golf course

Posted on Monday, March 3, 2014 at 9:00 am

Justin Shiflett of Chester set his sights on the seventh hole pin. Shiflett’s score of 113 was good for eighth place in the tournament’s advanced amateur level.  Photo by Katie Lutero

Justin Shiflett of Chester set his sights on the seventh hole pin. Shiflett’s score of 113 was good for eighth place in the tournament’s advanced amateur level. Photo by Katie Lutero

When Spotsylvania native John Biscoe designed and installed a nine-hole disc golf course through the heavily wooded terrain behind The Betty J. Queen Center in Louisa in August of 2012, he hoped that one day the course would hold events sanctioned by the Professional Disc Golf Association.

Biscoe didn’t have to wait long. On Saturday, Feb. 22, the first ever Betty Queen Open was held, with 40 highly skilled competitors doing battle for the contest’s inaugural bragging rights.

“I thought it went great,” said Biscoe, who served as the tournament’s director. “Everybody was very happy with the course.”

As director, Biscoe also had to be happy with those who traveled to compete. Despite it being the event’s maiden run, competitors such as Spotsylvania native Austin Pfaff, a world champion in the under-19 age bracket, as well as fellow PDGA member Stephen Miller of Stafford were in attendance.

The two didn’t disappoint. Pfaff went on to win the 18-hole event in a nail biter, birdieing the final three holes en route to a final score of 93, one stroke better than Miller, to take home a prize of $110. In the tournament’s second round – competitors played the nine-hole course twice – PDGA member Jay Land of Louisburg established a new nine-hole record with a scorching 44.

Competitions for various levels of skill were held for amateurs throughout the day as well, including advanced, intermediate and recreational.

“I think everyone thought the course was both fun and fair, which is really the two things we strive for when we put the courses in,” Biscoe said. “I thought it did a good job of sorting out the better players from some of us who aren’t so good.”

Biscoe aims to make the tournament an annual event, hoping it grows as much as the sport of disc golf itself has in recent years. Though the sport’s origins can be traced back as far as the 1920’s, formal rules weren’t created until the 1970’s. Disc golf is just like real golf, with competitors navigating natural obstacles and terrains in hopes of throwing their disc into an elevated metal basket known as a “Pole Hole.”

To read the entire story, see the Feb. 27 edition of The Central Virginian.

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