FFA–66 years strong and counting

On February 3, fans gathered to watch Super Bowl XLVIII.  While many huddled around their televisions to cheer on their beloved teams, others tuned in just to see t

To broaden and modernize its agricultural curriculum and offerings, Louisa County High School has added small animal care as one of the new focus areas.

he ever popular commercials, which cost advertisers well over $1 million for a 30-second spot. One of this year’s most talked about was the touching commercial aired by Dodge Trucks, “And God made a Farmer.” It reminded viewers of what agriculture is, but also what we’ve overcome and accomplished in the past 100 years.

2013 has now been branded as the “Year of the Farmer.” Farmers have been making a living in America since it was founded. Yet, it took much longer for any type of recognition to occur. Fast forward to 1928–the year the Future Farmers of America was established. Future Farmers of America was founded to ensure the work of the farmer wasn’t forgotten, and also to help develop and shape the future of agriculture itself.  Many people today still try to understand what the FFA is; yet many people also don’t know that the FFA changed its name in 1988 to The National FFA Organization. With its increasing numbers and agriculture constantly changing, the organization didn’t want its name to be misunderstood.

Likewise, the organization itself has changed.  And at Louisa County High School, we’re taking new approaches to modernize and broaden our agricultural curriculum and offerings.

In addition to the strong knowledge base we provide in agricultural mechanics, tractor work, and horticulture, we’ve responded to the demand from students who hope to become veterinarians. Small animal care I and II and Veterinary Science will be the new additions to our program. Our realigned program while consist of three main interest areas: Turf, Horticulture/Greenhouse, and Animal Science.

The National FFA Organizations motto is “Learning to Do, Doing to Learn, Earning to Live, Living to Serve.” The basis of the FFA is actually in the classroom, the Agriculture Education Program. The “three circles” encompass ‘classroom/lab, FFA, and SAE;’ each part of the circle an individualized sector that, as a whole, “work together to provide students with the personal, academic, and career experiences essential for success.” (The Official FFA Manual 2011-2012).

The Netherland Dwarf rabbit in Kathryn Simunich’s class recently gave birth to a single kit.

This week marks the 66th annual National FFA Week. Our theme is “Grow.” Growth, Leadership, and Success are the words we encourage all to be using this week! Activities during this week include a week-long “spirit” week at LCHS and a Brunswick Stew on Thursday, Feb 21. We will also be hosting a special guest speaker, Dr. Glenn Anderson- former State FFA Advisor. On Friday, we will serve a teacher breakfast for all teachers at LCHS as a thank you for supporting our students and our chapter this year.

The Louisa FFA Chapter encourages all to get out there and make a difference as we celebrate what FFA and agriculture means to us. Whether it’s thanking a farmer, planting a tree, or just appreciating the food at your table, please remember what a difference you can make. The students of the Louisa FFA will be the future of today’s agriculture community- and what remarkable additions to the community will they make!

 

By tcvnews
Posted on Friday, February 22, 2013 at 4:13 pm