Zucchini 500 is the newest ag fair game

Posted on Friday, July 5, 2013 at 1:38 pm

Ann Terrell and Patty Madison are in it to win it!  The pair gets ready to squash each other in their own private Zucchini 500 competition, which will be one of the newest events at the Louisa County Agricultural Fair this summer.

Ann Terrell and Patty Madison are in it to win it! The pair gets ready to squash each other in their own private Zucchini 500 competition, which will be one of the newest events at the Louisa County Agricultural Fair this summer.

There’s something new revving up at the Louisa County Agricultural Fair this year—pitting neighbor against neighbor in the first ever Zucchini 500 race.

Open to contestants of all ages, racing contenders will have to demonstrate their car making abilities by carving a zucchini into a mean, green, sleek machine that is designed to squash the competition.

The car body can be obtained with a simple trip to the family garden or the local farmers’ market. Tires and decorations can be retrieved from items already around the house.

Ann Terrell and Patty Madison, who are the designated “game masters” for the Louisa County Ag Fair wanted to try something different at this year’s fair.

Madison searched county fair games on the Internet and ran across the zucchini race idea and decided it may be something that would be a hit in Louisa.

Since this year’s ag fair theme is Homegrown Happiness, she thought the game would fit right in and give people of all ages something fun to compete in.

There will be three weight classes in the Zucchini 500: under 1.49 pounds, 1.5 to 2.5 pounds and 2.51 to 4 pounds.  Any entry over four pounds will be disqualified.

According to Madison, the race car must be made of real zucchini and must comprise the main part of the entry.

The zucchini itself can be no longer than one-foot in length, while decorations adorning the vegetable may extend no more than one-inch from the “front end” of the zucchini.  The entire zucchini racer may be no wider than eight inches, including wheels and decorations.

Wheel axles must be incorporated into the zucchini itself.  It’s not acceptable to just attach a zucchini to an existing vehicle that rolls.  This means no attaching the zucchini to a skateboard, roller skate or toy car.

The racer must feature three or four wheels, which can be of any type of material—wood, metal, vegetable or plastic.  Racers must be self-propelled.  No motors or auxiliary propulsion is allowed.

To keep the competition fair and determine which contest a participant qualifies, each zucchini racer will be weighed upon entry.  It must be sturdy enough to compete in multiple races.

For a hands-on understanding of the contest, Madison and Terrell got together last weekend and each made a racer for themselves. The results were nothing short of stunning.

When asked how long it took to make their racers, both responded simultaneously, “about an hour.”

It was obvious the two enjoyed getting creative with their race cars—and they were ready to see who built the fastest race car.

“We hope that families will participate,” said Madison. “It can be a group or individual entry.  It can be a great activity for grandparents and their grandchildren, too.”

To read the entire story, see the June 27 edition of The Central virginian.

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