Louisa workshop teaches volunteers through hands-on historic re-construction project

Posted on Friday, July 5, 2013 at 1:38 pm

Stephen Nash, co-worker of Salvagewrights owner Craig Jacobs, demonstrates how to properly glaze a window, which keeps moisture from seeping through.

Stephen Nash, co-worker of Salvagewrights owner Craig Jacobs, demonstrates how to properly glaze a window, which keeps moisture from seeping through.

The Louisa Historical Society gave members of the community a unique opportunity to get hands-on experience with the organization’s most recent project of restoring Michie House by holding a demonstration of skills workshop on Friday, June 14.

The Michie House is a 16- by 14-foot wooden home that was constructed in the mid- to late-eighteenth century.  Originally located on the property of a nearby Louisa farm, the structure was disassembled, moved to its current location behind the Sargeant Musuem, and is now being rebuilt to eventually serve as an extension of the museum.

Craig Jacobs, owner of Salvagewrights Ltd. and the chief architect of the Michie House project, provided most of the instruction during the workshop. Jacobs gave lessons ranging from how to glaze windows to protect from moisture to the process of fashioning replacement wooden pegs for the building’s walls.

After the demonstration of skills, attendees were encouraged to try to replicate the technique themselves. While modern tools were used occasionally in the demonstrations, Jacobs primarily used tools from the Revolutionary era to give viewers an idea of the process the original builders would have followed.

Jacobs, who specializes in the usage of tools from centuries ago, saw the demonstration as a chance to share his passion for the art.

To read the entire story, see the June 27 edition of The Central Virginian.

Headlines of the Day