Louisa man shot by deputy denied bond

The man who was shot by a Louisa County Sheriff’s Office deputy at Hillcrest Cemetery in Louisa was denied bond on April 16 and will remain in jail. Michael Tyrone Rowe appeared in Louisa General District Court Tuesday seated in a wheelchair. He is charged with one felony count of assault on a law enforcement

The man who was shot by a Louisa County Sheriff’s Office deputy at Hillcrest Cemetery in Louisa was denied bond on April 16 and will remain in jail.

Michael Tyrone Rowe appeared in Louisa General District Court Tuesday seated in a wheelchair. He is charged with one felony count of assault on a law enforcement officer in connection with the incident.

Tina Rowe, the mother of the 32-year-old Louisa County man who was shot, said he was struck three times, in his leg, back and side on April 6. He was treated at UVA Medical Center in Charlottesville for his injuries.

Brittany Hinton, assistant commonwealth’s attorney, asked the court to deny bond because they believe that Rowe poses a threat to himself and others if released. Hinton cited mental health and prior convictions of assault and battery on family members as reasons for him to remain behind bars.

The prosecutor said that on the morning of the incident, Rowe called the Louisa County Sheriff’s Office and told dispatchers he was at the cemetery, had a knife and wanted to kill himself.

In an interview with The Central Virginian last week, Tina Rowe said her son had left the house early the morning of the incident to visit his grandfather’s grave in the cemetery.

When Deputy A. Rademeyer responded to the cemetery, he turned off his lights and siren so that he wouldn’t agitate Rowe further, according to the prosecutor. Hinton said that Rowe told the deputy that he’d lost custody of his four children and “wanted to die.”

The deputy asked Rowe several times during their conversation to drop the knife, the prosecutor said, but he did not comply and said the officer would have to kill him.

(Article by Deana Meredith)

This is a partial article. Read the full story in The Central Virginian’s April 18, 2019 issue.